More Thoughts On Music and Monetization

Wow you guys. What a great discussion about what I shared last week on the blog. The comments on Facebook here were really interesting... I was going to respond all at once but ended up responding individually and wanted to share it here too. 

There’s a lot of food for thought in the comments about alternate streaming models, discretionary income spending and just the general overall perceived value of music and musicians as well as lots of support for music and musicians. 

I personally feel better just having that dialogue and conversation. I think people realize that the system is somewhat broken and hopefully more conversations like this one only help. For fans to get to see behind the curtain of what it really takes to bring them the music they love might be good too; but that was one of the points I brought up in the comments on Facebook. 

There’s a big movement to share so much but I wonder sometimes where the line is and what is too much. Should I share exactly how much I spent on catering while recording my last album? Should I share the rates my friends charged me to record and work on my projects? I think some of that is crossing the line and not really necessary. It does give a perceived value to the music though when you realize it’s not just something that happens in a vacuum or something an artist does just for fun but real work and money to make projects come to life. 

I’m not saying I have the answers at all just happy to be having this dialogue.

1 comment

  • Marko Fazio
    Marko Fazio Los Angeles
    This is such a tricky subject. To make it short, I feel that music (recorded music) is becoming more of a commodity than a real experience nowadays. It is not sacred anymore. I think that there are a few reasons why: The music business was in a really bad shape after the whole Napster thing in 2000 (pre-legal streaming era). In order to fight back piracy and counteract a whole new generation of consumers who had been listening to music for free for 10 years, some compromise had to be done and one thing was to offer legal streaming for free to the consumer (Spotify). The dematerialization of music did not help. It's harder to see the value in something that is untangible. On a side note, the movie industry transitioned much better in the streaming era (thanks to Netflix which never had to give away movie subscription for free) Technology (digital revolution) has put the recording studio in anyone's hands. Whether or not this is a good thing (other debate), the result is that the supply is way higher than the demand. When that happens, price goes down (and the perceived value). There are so many ways for the consumer to be entertained nowadays (Netflix, Youtube, social media, video games). Youtube is the biggest music streaming platform and they are the one who pays the least. They are surely not helping the consumer in wanting to pay for music. There are probably more reasons but that's the main ones I can think of.

    This is such a tricky subject.
    To make it short, I feel that music (recorded music) is becoming more of a commodity than a real experience nowadays. It is not sacred anymore. I think that there are a few reasons why:
    The music business was in a really bad shape after the whole Napster thing in 2000 (pre-legal streaming era). In order to fight back piracy and counteract a whole new generation of consumers who had been listening to music for free for 10 years, some compromise had to be done and one thing was to offer legal streaming for free to the consumer (Spotify).
    The dematerialization of music did not help. It's harder to see the value in something that is untangible. On a side note, the movie industry transitioned much better in the streaming era (thanks to Netflix which never had to give away movie subscription for free)
    Technology (digital revolution) has put the recording studio in anyone's hands. Whether or not this is a good thing (other debate), the result is that the supply is way higher than the demand. When that happens, price goes down (and the perceived value).
    There are so many ways for the consumer to be entertained nowadays (Netflix, Youtube, social media, video games).
    Youtube is the biggest music streaming platform and they are the one who pays the least. They are surely not helping the consumer in wanting to pay for music.

    There are probably more reasons but that's the main ones I can think of.

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